Preparation and Arrival

 
Telephones
Telephones are provided in each room, except on the Maximum Care Unit. Patients may receive calls in their rooms from 7 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Local calls may be made at any time from the room by dialing 9 and the number. Long-distance and toll calls can be made at any time by dialing 9 + 0 + (area code) and the number. Long-distance calls cannot be charged to your room. You can make a credit card call or charge a long-distance call back to your home number.  You may call the hospital operator by dialing 0 at any time for assistance.
 
Cellular Phone
Due to the potential risk to patient equipment, cellular phones may not be used by patients and visitors inside the
hospital.
 
Smoking Policy
As of October 1, 2008 all tobacco products – including cigarettes, cigars, pipes and chewing tobacco – will be
prohibited on all Granville Health System campuses, both inside and outside.
 
Patient Valuables
Granville Medical Center will encourage patients to send home with family members, if possible, any valuable belongings (e.g., wallet, purse, jewelry, keys). However, if the patient is unable to do so, the staff will place the valuables in the safe at Granville Medical Center. You will be given an itemized, written receipt for all items, which must be presented when you withdraw them. Granville Medical Center will not be responsible for any articles that are not placed in the safe.
 
Advance Directives – Living Wills and Health Care Power of Attorney
An advance directive is a set of directions you give outlining the health care you want to receive if you lose the ability to make decisions for yourself. North Carolina has two methods to make a formal advance directive. One option is called a “Living Will”; the other is called a “Health Care Power of Attorney”. The patient’s attending physician must comply with any advance directive that qualifies as a living will under North Carolina law.  Making a living will or health care power of attorney is your choice. If you become unable to make your own decisions, and you have no living will or a person named to make medical decisions for you, your health care agent, doctor or health care provider will consult with someone close to you about your care.  What is a living will? In North Carolina, a living will is a document that tells others that you want to die a natural death if you are terminally and incurably sick or in a persistent vegetative state from which you will not recover.  In a living will, you can direct your doctor not to use heroic treatments that would prolong your life; for example, by using a breathing machine (respirator or ventilator) or to stop such treatments if they have been started. You can also direct your doctor not to begin or to stop giving you food and water through a tube (artificial nutrition or hydration).  What is a health care power of attorney? In North Carolina, you can name a person to make medical care decisions for you if you later become unable to decide for yourself. In the legal document you name who you want your agent to be. You can say what medical treatments you would want and what you would not want. Your agent then knows what choices you would make.  You should choose someone you trust and discuss your wishes with the person before you put them in writing.  Forms are available on line at www.sosnc.com. Forms are also available through our Admissions Department at ext. 3328 or 3333.